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Are you feeling stressed out of caring for a loved one with dementia? It's a journey filled with challenges, but there's a beacon of hope that can guide you through the rough waters. Coaching offers a path to navigate this journey with greater ease and understanding.

How To Decrease Your Stress As A Dementia Caregiver Through Coaching

0:01:51 Decreasing Stress with Dementia Coaching
0:03:29 Understanding the Role of a Dementia Coach
0:14:32 Pros and Cons of Dementia Coaching and Skilled Therapy
0:27:17 Why Both Dementia Coaching and Skilled Therapy Are Necessary
0:32:55 Special Invitation for Founding 54 Families
0:37:52 Recap and Importance of Dementia Coaching and Skilled Therapy

A New Perspective on Care

Dementia coaching is a lifeline for those entangled in the daily struggles of caregiving. It sheds light on the complexities of dementia, offering practical advice, emotional support, and strategies to manage daily challenges. Tailored to the caregiver's needs, dementia coaching focuses on creating a positive environment and employing a problem-solving approach. It's about moving beyond venting frustrations to finding actionable solutions that improve your life and the life of your loved one.

The Role of a Dementia Coach

What exactly does a dementia coach do? They specialize in understanding dementia and the caregiving process. Their expertise allows them to provide you with effective communication strategies and practical solutions to manage the changing behaviors associated with dementia. A dementia coach works with you to promote a positive care environment, focusing on problem-solving rather than just emotional support.

Why Both Dementia Coaching and Skilled Therapy Matter

The journey of dementia caregiving is complex, requiring more than one type of support. While skilled therapy focuses on the physical and cognitive needs of those living with dementia, dementia coaching centers on the caregiver. It emphasizes the importance of self-care, equipping caregivers with the tools and knowledge to provide the best possible care without losing themselves in the process.

Joining Forces for a Better Tomorrow

Dementia caregiving doesn't have to be a lone battle. Embracing both dementia coaching and skilled therapy offers a comprehensive support system that addresses the needs of both the caregiver and the loved one with dementia. It's about finding balance, gaining skills, and ensuring both you and your loved one can navigate the dementia journey with dignity and grace.

An Invitation to Transformation

For those ready to take a step towards better caregiving, consider joining a dementia coaching program. It offers an opportunity for long-term support, community, and personal growth. Remember, you're not alone on this journey. With the right support and resources, you can navigate the challenges of dementia caregiving with confidence and hope.

Caring for a loved one with dementia is a profound expression of love and dedication. But it's also a journey that demands much from the caregiver. By seeking support and embracing the guidance of a dementia coach, you can find a path through the storm, ensuring both you and your loved one find peace and fulfillment along the way.

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If you feel like dementia caregiving is hard and unpredictable and you are struggling to help a spouse or a parent living with dementia, join our next free workshop.
 https://www.dementiacaregivingmadeeasy.com/wsl

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Introduction and Start of Podcast

[0:02] Who here has ever heard that family caregivers of people living with Alzheimer's and dementia are actually at a higher mortality rate than non-caregivers of the same age?

How many of you guys have actually heard that? Well, if you haven't heard that yet, I invite you to listen to today's episode, which is episode 92, how to decrease your stress as a dementia caregiver through dementia coaching and listen to how high a percentage of family caregivers of a person living with dementia that actually die before the person that they're caring for.

So you'll have to listen to the episode to find out what percentage that is.

[0:56] Hey there, success seeker. Welcome to Dementia Caregiving for Families.

Do you feel overwhelmed with the daily struggle of dementia caregiving, looking for an easier path?

You're in the right place. On this podcast, we teach you the skills to simplify caregiving.

We unravel the mystery of dementia and guide you through the often difficult behaviors.

I'm Lizette, your host and fellow family caregiver.

As an occupational therapist, I bring my professional and personal experience to this community.

Here we speak the truth, but without the verbal vomit.

I know you will find value in today's program.

So buckle up while this flight takes off.

Decreasing Stress with Dementia Coaching

[1:51] Today, in episode 92, we are going to look at how you can decrease your stress as a dementia caregiver by using dementia coaching.

How many of you know that the caregivers of a person living with dementia and Alzheimer's have an almost 63% higher mortality rate than the person living with dementia? Did you know that?

I don't know about you, but that scares me since I am a family member of a person living with dementia and I do not want to be one of those people.

63%, that's 6 out of 10 caregivers of a person living with dementia will actually pass away before the person that they are taking care of.

That is an extremely high mortality rate for a dementia caregiver, right?

I don't know about you, but that definitely does not need to be you or I.

So I'm extremely grateful that you are here today listening to this episode because we are going to talk about dementia coaching and what dementia coaching is and why, in in my never-to-be-humble opinion, it is vitally important for family caregivers.

[3:16] Of a person living with dementia to consider actually getting a dementia coach.

So what is a dementia coach? We're going to look at today's episode.

We're going to look at it in three different formats.

Understanding the Role of a Dementia Coach

[3:29] We're going to look at what a dementia coach is.

We're going to look at what skilled therapy is, and then we are also going to look at why both are needed, because you do need both.

But we're going to unpack that today in this episode.

So what is a dementia coach?

A dementia coach is a person who is specialized in dementia and dementia caregiving.

They know and understand the process of dementia, and they can provide practical advice, advice, emotional support, as well as strategies to manage and help with the daily challenges that a person living with dementia and their family caregivers typically go through.

It is very important that a dementia coach work with you related to tailoring it to the the caregiver's needs, not the person living with dementia, but tailored to the care provider, the caregiver's need.

[4:35] It is also vitally important that a dementia coach be able to teach you effective communication, strategies so that you can learn how to communicate with the person that you are helping who is living with dementia.

And that it is vitally important that a dementia coach be able to provide you with strategies, Practical strategies to manage the often changing behaviors or the changes that are very normal in a person living with dementia.

[5:09] But do so in providing and promoting a positive environment of care.

And a dementia coach always comes from a problem-solving-based approach and not from just an emotional support approach.

Now, what do I mean by a positive, supportive environment or a positive, supportive approach is that a dementia coach is not there to just allow a person who is frustrated and tired and overwhelmed from being a family caregiver to just have what I call verbal vomit and just go, and just let it all out without taking the next step, which is actually implementing and finding resolutions to those problems.

[6:13] Because if all you're doing when you are in a support group, or if you're talking to someone else and you're just expressing your emotions, which are valid, your emotions are valid.

It is valid to be overwhelmed at times.

It is valid to be stressed at times.

It is valid to not want to have this in your life.

All of those emotions are valid, but that doesn't mean that once you've expressed those emotions that you stay there and wallow in them.

What a dementia coach is designed to help you do is to actually then take that expression of your valid emotions and help you reframe it into a solution, a practical.

[7:06] Active solution that you can work on to change your life.

Because just complaining about something, quite frankly, is really not helpful.

It's not helpful to you as the family caregiver, and it is certainly not helpful to the person that you are helping take care of.

So a dementia coach's role is to understand both the dementia process and what that means practically, you know, related to dementia and dementia caregiving, but help you work through your emotions and provide you with practical, reasonable, actionable solutions for you to actually implement so so that you don't just stay where you are, because nothing's going to get better unless you do something different, right?

What's the old adage or saying if you, what's the definition of insanity?

[8:09] And the definition of insanity is doing something over and over again and expecting a different result.

So, if you are a family caregiver who has been used to just complaining or, you know, expressing your emotions, expressing your frustrations, but you're not taking this step further, which is to actually do something about it, it is going to result in you staying where you are because, you know, like I joked, what is the definition of insanity, right?

It's doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.

I can guarantee you I have done this thousands of times in my life.

When I complain about something and I don't reframe it in my own mind to actually be a solution-based approach, then my emotions don't change.

My reality that I live in doesn't change, then everything is terrible and everything is awful.

[9:18] Did you know that caring for a person with dementia doesn't have to be this hard?

If you are struggling and you would like to join our next free workshop, the topic of the workshop is three tips how to avoid challenging dementia behaviors without stress, anxiety, or burnout.

I invite you to walk away with science-backed dementia caregiving skills that many professionals don't even know after attending this free workshop.

If you'd like to register, message me the word.

[10:05] Workshop on Instagram or check out the link in the show notes below.

It spills over into all aspects of my life, not just then my dementia caregiving.

I'll just use this as a practical example. When I was working full-time, if I was having a bad day at work, I was having a bad day at home.

I would frequently come home and not the best approach with my kids, but I was not the world's most patient mom when my children were little, and I significantly regret that still to today.

But I've learned over time to be able to really go into my own head and reframe it for for myself, because if I stay in that mind space, if I stay in that space.

[11:01] Nothing gets better.

My relationship with my husband is bad.

My relationship, if my dad calls or anything like that, then I'm impatient.

And the only thing I have any control over is how I respond.

And so So then I work very hard on reframing my own mind so that I'm able to be in a better mind space and come up with a solution for whatever's going on.

So it's very much a problem-solving, dementia coaching is very much a problem-solving-based approach.

Now, what are some of the pros of dementia coaching?

[11:45] Number one is there are no doctors involved. It's direct access, which means you can pick your dementia coach.

You can pick who you want to work with, and you can 100% be assured that if the person is saying that they are a dementia coach, that they actually have the background and the knowledge base related to dementia and dementia caregiving, that they can actually be helpful.

That they specialize in dementia and dementia care, and that they have practical solutions for your practical problems to actually help you.

And then you also know the third part, the third thing that's a pro related to a dementia coach is a dementia coach focuses on you, your family caregiver.

They focus on you as the caregiver. They do not focus on the person living with dementia.

Now, why is that so important, Lisette? Well, it's that old story that if you are on an airplane.

[12:54] And the oxygen masks fall down and the plane is coming, you know, something's happened and the plane is in trouble, you are informed and told that in order for you to help the child that you're flying with or a person that needs assistance that you're flying with, in order for you to actually be able to help them, you have to put the oxygen mask on yourself.

Everybody uses this analogy, but it's because the analogy is 100% correct.

If you don't put the oxygen mask on yourself and you put it on the person that you're flying with first, and then you pass out from lack of oxygen, then guess what?

You're that 63% family caregivers whose higher mortality rate than the person who they are actually caring for.

So 63% of those people who put the oxygen mask on the person that they're helping have died in that analogy.

That's a lot of family caregivers.

And I don't want to be that person. So when you have a dementia coach, the dementia coach is focused on you as the family caregiver.

Yes, they will be considering the person that you are are helping, absolutely.

But their primary focus is on helping you as the family caregiver.

[14:23] And then another pro for a dementia coach is you choose who you want to work with.

You get to pick your dementia coach.

Pros and Cons of Dementia Coaching and Skilled Therapy

[14:32] You can interview as many dementia coaches as you want until you find the person who resonates with you, until you find the person who aligns with with your life, with your values, with your philosophy, and then you can work with them for an extended period of time, for lifetime of the person that you're helping, because what the research actually shows, and I'll bring this out in the last point again, is that the Alzheimer's Association Facts and Figures Report of 2023 shows that longitudinal support, which means not just support today or tomorrow, but month in, month out, year in, year out through this process, is actually what is effective in decreasing a family caregiver's burnout and stress.

The reality is the healthcare system is not set up.

[15:39] To provide that longitudinal support. Now, one of the cons of a dementia coach is it is not a reimbursable service because it is focused on you as the family caregiver.

It is not focused on the person living with dementia.

If you're not familiar with coaching, coaching is a very wonderful way of actually meeting your goals, finding out what the problems are that have you stuck, giving you a different way of looking at things and being very, very much a problem-solving approach, but where you as the person who is being coached are coming up with your own solutions.

You're being guided by a coach.

So a dementia coach is a very new thing. It's not something that's been around forever and ever.

But I think a dementia coach is going to start to play a significant role for the right people who are actually willing to invest in themselves and invest in their long-term health and well-being by hiring coaches, dementia coaches, to actually help them through this dementia caregiving process.

So that's the first point. Now, the second point is we're going to talk about what is skilled therapy. So.

[17:04] I am an occupational therapist. That is my background and training.

I have a professional degree that I obtained from the University of Pretoria in South Africa in 1992 as an occupational therapist.

I'm licensed to practice as an occupational therapist and I can go and when I'm working at a facility, I can bill Medicare for occupational therapy services.

So it is a a licensed and skilled professional service provided for that is paid for by insurance, whether it be Medicare, whether it be Medicaid, whether it be private insurance.

[17:48] But the goal behind skilled therapy is to maintain or improve the physical and cognitive skills of the person living with the deficit.

So, for example, if it is a child with autism, you know, the goal would be to be working on the skills that that child with autism needs in order to be successful in the community or with their relationships or be able to take their showers by themselves or manage their behaviors.

It is a skilled process that the the insurance companies dictate what is considered skilled, right?

So an occupational therapist or a physical therapist or a speech-language pathologist are typically the people who are involved with dementia and dementia caregiving from a skilled therapy perspective.

[18:48] They do assessments. assessments they have clinical outcomes that they have to meet or reach in order for the person to continue with skilled therapy and there have to be measurable goals that are related to the person's functioning and it is 100 focused on the patient the person living with dementia yes as a skilled therapist, you are doing caregiver education, you are teaching the caregiver what they need to know about health.

[19:23] The situation that they're in and how to help the person.

But it's teaching them things like home exercise programs in order to strengthen the person living with dementia or other related skills related to that person with dementia who's probably being seen for something different than their dementia diagnosis because they fell and broke their hip or those kinds of things.

So the pros of skilled therapy are, yes, insurance pays for it.

Medicare pays for skilled PT, OT, and speech-language pathology.

It has to be skilled therapy.

So it doesn't always, some people do not qualify because what they're experiencing is not considered skilled therapy anymore. more.

Another pro is it is physician-driven.

You have to have both a diagnosis and a prescription in order to see a physical therapist or an occupational therapist or a speech-language pathologist if you're on Medicare.

Another pro is that it is 100% focused on the person living with dementia.

But what are some of the cons? What are some of the cons of having skilled therapy?

[20:42] One of the biggest cons, specifically, in my opinion, related to dementia and dementia caregiving is that you get what you get.

And what do I mean by that is, say you live in the middle of nowhere, South Carolina, and your loved one has fallen and they broke a hip and they had delirium in the hospital from cancer.

Being, you know, having anesthesia. Then they went to a skilled nursing facility. They had their rehab.

And now they come home. And you live in the middle of nowhere, South Carolina, and you've picked XYZ Home Health Care Agency.

Well, XYZ Home Health Care Agency is going to send ABC ABC therapists.

[21:28] And ABC therapists may not have any interest or any background or any specific training in how to truly help a person living with dementia.

Because therapists are wonderful creatures, but they have their own interest level.

So if they're not specifically interested in in working with somebody living with dementia, they are going to be a jack of all trades and a master of none.

Did you know that caring for a person with dementia doesn't have to be this hard?

If you are struggling and you would like to join our next free workshop, the topic of the workshop is is three tips how to avoid challenging dementia behaviors without stress, anxiety, or burnout.

I invite you to walk away with science-backed dementia caregiving skills that many professionals don't even know after attending this free workshop.

[22:39] If you'd like to register, message me the word workshop on Instagram or check out the link in the show notes below.

So you will get what you get. It is not necessarily just because you have a diagnosis of dementia that you are going to get a person, a therapist, coming to see you in your home that is actually a dementia specialist.

You may sometimes be blessed and have somebody like me show up at your door and be able to truly have gained from that experience. They may muddle through.

The therapist may be able to adequately muddle through and provide you the therapy for that broken hip, but they may not really be the right person to truly help you or your loved one living with dementia with their dementia process because that's not their specialty.

Another con is that insurance dictates what is considered progress.

So sometimes a lot of people have a Medicare replacement policy like Humana or UnitedHealthcare or Aetna or one of these. And.

[24:00] It's 100% my recommendation. If you have the choice of being on traditional Medicare, it is significantly better for your loved one and for yourself to be on a traditional Medicare plan and not a Medicare replacement plan like Aetna or United or Human or one of those.

They are supposed to follow Medicare's rules and they do follow Medicare's rules, but they apply them slightly differently to the traditional Medicare A process.

Now, in full disclosure, my mom and dad do have a replacement policy because they emigrated at the age of 62 and 60, and it was just financially not feasible for them to get a supplemental plan related to traditional Medicare with a supplement.

So I have chosen Aetna as my parents' provider because for them, it is the best provider.

But you have to do your research.

So insurance will dictate what's considered progress.

[25:11] Insurance then will also dictate when it's time to stop your therapy.

Now, you can appeal that decision, but if they review it and they come back and say, oh, it should have stopped two weeks before, then you're responsible for the difference for what is not considered skilled therapy anymore.

So, that's a negative, that's a con, and it is not focused focused specifically on the caregiver.

A skilled therapy considers the caregiver, but it is not caregiver-centric.

It is patient-centric. It is person with the prescription-centric.

It is not focused on the caregiver.

The caregiver is taken into account.

The caregiver is given education, and those are very important pieces of education, but it is not focused on what's best for the caregiver.

It is focused 100% on what is best for the person living with the need for the therapy.

[26:19] So therapists really cannot consider the pros and the cons necessarily of their recommendations as related to what's best for the caregiver.

They have to look at it from what's best for the person that they are treating, their patient.

And another drawback of skilled therapy is that it is very time limited.

It is very specific periods of time that you can have it.

You can maybe have it four weeks, six weeks, eight weeks, whatever that timeline is, but that's a small time.

[26:55] A snapshot of the time that a person living with dementia is going to be requiring, assistance and when changes are going to be occurring.

So that is point number two related to what is skilled therapy.

And point number three is why do you need both?

Why Both Dementia Coaching and Skilled Therapy Are Necessary

[27:18] Well, both are 100% vital and necessary because they are complementary roles.

So the skilled therapy is focusing on the person living with the dementia or the person living with the skilled need.

And the dementia coach, specifically related to dementia coaching, is 100% focused on the family caregiver.

That is, their primary role is to help the family caregiver navigate the process of a dementia caregiving journey, take into account the person living with dementia, but truly focused on the family caregiver.

[28:02] So the Alzheimer's Facts and Figures Report of 2022 or 23, I'm pretty sure it was 22, D delineates out what is considered to be an effective dementia caregiver support.

What is considered to be effective dementia caregiver support?

The following are what are the characteristics that are required for something according to evidences, evidence-based practice.

What has been found to be effective for caregiver support is the following.

Number one, the caregiver is active in the process. They are not passive.

When a person is receiving skilled therapy, typically the caregiver is very passive.

But in order for dementia to...

[28:58] Support to be effective, the caregiver has to be active.

That's the first thing. You have to be an active caregiver.

You cannot passively wait. It's not going to go away sticking your head in the sand and pretending that it's going to go.

You don't have to deal with it. It is not going to be effective.

So a caregiver is active. The second part, according to the research, is an effective characteristic for caregivers is that the program is tailored and flexible.

It has to be able to be flexible because dementia is going to change over time.

So, the program that is chosen in order for it to be effective has to be tailored and flexible.

Number three, Three, an effective program takes into consideration the needs of both the caregiver and the person living with dementia.

So it considers the needs of both.

[30:02] Number four, it provides for increasing the skills of the caregiver and the competency.

[30:13] Of the caregiver to provide the care at home.

So the caregiver is active, the program is flexible, it meets the need of both people, and it teaches the caregiver the skills, the actual skills that they need in order to provide care.

[30:34] The fifth point is it is adjustable with the changing needs of the person who is changing.

So the changing, you know, as the person living with dementia is changing, the program is changing with them.

The sixth thing is an effective program provides for emotional support of the family caregiver.

And then it is longitudinal over time.

So it is effective only when it is longitudinal over time.

So even though a dementia coach and a skilled therapist can look very similar, they have vastly different roles, they have vastly different emphasis, and the dementia coach's emphasis is on you as the family caregiver. caregiver.

Now, I'm not the only dementia coach out there. There are other people who are dementia coaches.

However, if I resonate with you, if you like what you hear when you come to this podcast as a family caregiver, I invite you to come to my next free workshop, which is on the.

[31:51] 16th, which is tomorrow, this episode will go live on the 15th of March.

My next free workshop, where we talk about three tips to manage challenging behaviors in people living with dementia, will be tomorrow on March the 16th.

Now, having said that, I also want to invite you that if you resonate with me as a dementia coach, keeping in mind everything that I said about what makes an effective dementia program for family caregivers is that the caregivers are active, the programs are tailored and flexible, it meets the needs of both the caregiver and the person living with dementia, it teaches you the competency that you need in order to provide care.

[32:43] It is adjustable over time, it provides emotional support, and it is over an extended period of time.

I have a very special invitation for you today.

Special Invitation for Founding 54 Families

[32:56] Until the end of March, March the 31st, I am recruiting what I call my founding 54 families for a low-cost group coaching program, A low-cost, dementia-specific group coaching program.

Why a group coaching program?

[33:22] Because it is longitudinal support over an extended period of time. It is flexible.

You get emotional support from the community.

We have community around you. You know that you are not alone.

And the reason that I'm doing, that I'm promoting this Bounding 54 member entry point for people who are early adopters to this program is the following.

Until March 31st, if you join now as an early adopter and you help me develop this program for you specifically, because I'm taking the comments and the requirements and the problems personally.

[34:13] That the early adopters have, and I'm tailoring it specifically for them because I'm looking for family caregivers who are active and want a solution to this problem that they are experiencing, which is typically significant caregiver stress and burnout.

That's the biggest thing that I hear people say is, I'm burnt out and I'm stressed from dealing with all the day-to-day challenges.

But if you join this innovative program before March the 31st, the biggest benefit that you can get is the people who are joining now for the lifetime of the person that they are supporting.

So if it's somebody who has mild dementia, if they live another 10 years, I promise to walk with you for the next 10 years until that person passes away.

Way. So it's a one-time investment.

And please note, I've been very clear from the beginning, it is a low-cost group coaching program.

I'm not talking about $10,000.

I am talking about a low-cost program.

Then after March the 31st, it will be an annual investment because I want people to have skin in the game so that they can actually benefit from it week in, week out.

But if you join by March 31st, after that, it goes away.

[35:43] If you are willing to commit to yourself to be a Founding 54 family member, then I promise that I will walk with you through this process for the rest of that person's life, which I think is a pretty sweet deal. deal.

I'm building into this process.

There will be backups built into it in the sense of I will find other coaches over time to help supplement me so it's not just me doing it, but I promise to give you longitudinal support over time.

So if I resonate with you, I invite you to sign up for for the workshop tomorrow, even if you cannot come.

I will do one more between now and the end of March.

I will do another workshop if you cannot make tomorrow's workshop.

But the 31st of March, I'm going to shut down the lifetime access to coaching.

I think it's a wonderful benefit for the people who are willing to invest in me as I invest in them.

And so if I resonate with you, don't.

[36:53] Don't stay on the fence. Join this program. It is not an expensive program.

It's not $10,000. It's not $20,000.

It is an investment. It has to hurt a little bit or else you won't value it.

But I promise you, it's not as expensive as you think. link.

Somebody actually reached out to me and when we had a dialogue, they said, oh, I thought this was going to be $10,000.

[37:18] I have a lot of people who tell me it should be $10,000, but I want to serve many people.

And I can't serve many people if I don't make my price point at a point where most people can access it.

It has to hurt a little bit or else you won't value it.

But I invite you you that if I've resonated with you to please join the workshop, the information is in the show notes, or if you're ready to join, the information to join the program will be in the show notes as well.

Recap and Importance of Dementia Coaching and Skilled Therapy

[37:53] So just a quick recap of today's episode. We were talking about how to decrease your stress as a dementia caregiver through dementia coaching, and we talked about what it means to to actually be a dementia coach or get dementia coaching, what skilled therapy is.

And then the last point we talked about is that both are actually needed.

They're just needed at different periods of time. So thank you for listening to today's episode.

I'm very excited about this program. It is going to be awesome.

And I really hope that even if I'm not the right coach for you, that as a family caregiver, helping somebody living with dementia, that you will find yourself a dementia coach. They are not therapists.

[38:42] It is a different way of looking at the problem. So let us help you find the support you need.

If you're not quite ready for this, keep coming back. I promise I'm going to continue to educate.

I'm going to continue to support you. I am here. this is my calling.

This is my life's mission and my calling.

It lights my fire to be able to help family caregivers of people living with dementia. So come back next episode.

I'm looking forward to serving you and thank you for listening today.

Thanking the Audience and Encouraging Engagement

[39:22] Thanks for joining me today, Success Seeker. I pour my heart and soul into this program to serve you.

You can serve me by leaving a review on Apple Podcasts and join our free Facebook group, Dementia Caregiving for Families.

It's a positive and proactive space to navigate dementia caregiving together.

Get practical tools and find support, but without the verbal vomit.

Be a part of our community where we seek to find peace of mind and ease, despite the dementia diagnosis.

So join today and see you next time as our flight takes off.

Subscribe To Dementia Caregiving For Families Podcast

If you feel like dementia caregiving is hard and unpredictable and you are struggling to help a spouse or a parent living with dementia, join our next free workshop.
 https://www.dementiacaregivingmadeeasy.com/wsl

Join our Facebook Group at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1301886810018410 

Become a  Member of Our Exclusive Program!  https://www.dementiacaregivingmadeeasy.com/start

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About the author

“Think Different” Dementia’s owner, Lizette Cloete, OTR/L graduated as an Occupational Therapist from the University of Pretoria in South Africa in 1992. Lizette has almost 30 years of experience as an Occupational Therapist in a variety of settings, the latest being in the home health environment. She enjoys teaching on the topic of dementia, most recently presenting at a national conference on the topic “Dementia Made Simple”.

Disclaimer: These blogs, videos and any work done by Lizette Cloete OT, as a Member of Think Different Dementia, LLC, is given only as educational content and consulting work. This does not create an Occupational Therapist-Patient Relationship. The educational content and consulting work performed should not be considered medical treatment as an Occupational Therapist. The consulting work does not take the place of medical work normally performed by a licensed Occupational Therapist. Please consult a licensed Occupational Therapist for medical advice.

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